853001008229
853001008243

Haitianola

Lakou Mizik

Regular
£10.99
Sale
Regular
£10.99
Sold Out
Unit Price
per 

Format: 12"

Cat No: CMBCD122

Release Date:  25 October 2019

Label:  Cumbancha

Packaging Type:  Slip Sleeve (CD or Vinyl)

No of Units:  1

Barcode:  853001008229

Genres:  World Music  Tropical  

Release Date:  25 October 2019

Label:  Cumbancha

Packaging Type:  Slip Sleeve (CD or Vinyl)

No of Units:  1

Barcode:  853001008243

Genres:  World Music  Tropical  

  • Description

    Recorded at Arcade Fire's studio, the new album by Lakou Mizik is produced by the same New Orleans producer Eric Heigle who worked the album.



    Amidst the bustle of Jazz Fest, many in the New Orleans music community embraced the project and graciously made time in their hectic schedules to come jam with Lakou Mizik. The legendary Preservation Hall Jazz Band added their timeless touch; master pianist Jon Cleary tickled New Orleans-style riffs over the band's Haitian Vodou prayers; Lost Bayou Ramblers added heavy Cajun grit; Haitian-American singer songwriter Leyla McCalla brought spine-tingling cello playing; guitar maestro Raja Kassis (Antibalas) sprinkled his six-string magic all over the tracks; and The Soul Rebels brass band blew the roof off the studio. Soon after the NOLA sessions, Eric Heigle and Jon Cleary traveled to Haiti to record with Lakou Mizik at the Artists Institute in Jacmel. Over the next few months additional sessions allowed for more guests to jump in. Iconic figures Cyril Neville, Trombone Shorty and Anders Osborne, rising star Tarriona "Tank" Ball (Tank and the Bangas), NOLA institution King James (from the Special Men), even Win & Régine from Arcade Fire helped create the unique, culture-melding sound of this album.



    The seed for Lakou Mizik's second album, HaitiaNola, to be released the Cumbacha label, was planted in 2017 when the band was invited to play the legendary New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. It was an eye-opening pilgrimage to the mythical music city and the band members immediately felt a connection. The music, the food, the architecture all reminded them of home.



    For those familiar with the history of Haiti and New Orleans, this makes a lot of sense. The Caribbean country and the Crescent City have deep historical connections. In 1791, Haitian slaves began rising up against their French masters and earned their freedom in 1804 after years of bloody rebellion. Thousands of refugees consisting of French colonists, freed people of color and slaves fled the turmoil of the revolution and ended up in the nearest French territory: New Orleans. This influx doubled the city's population and forever changed its ethnic and cultural identity.

    To this day, Haitian influences can be felt in the music of New Orleans. From the rhythms of the Mardi Gras parades to the swampy grooves of funk, echoes of this Haitian connection can still be heard in the sounds of the city. It can also be felt in the food, language, spirituality and so much more. a sunny day, when the musicians of Lakou Mizik found themselves walking down Frenchmen Street, they hatched the idea for HaitiaNola (Haiti & NOLA & Hispaniola = HaitiaNola).



    "A life-affirming, joyous statement that will have you leaping up and dancing. I defy anyone to listen and stand still."
    - Sydney Morning Herald



    "A Caribbean-Creole melting pot.
    A rich stew of Caribbean flavours."
    - The Guardian



    "A landmark in Caribbean music."
    - NPR's All Things Considered



    "A joy to experience. Stunning."
    - PopMatters



    "Hooting horns from Haiti's rara carnival tradition mix with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band; there's percussion from all sides and an earth-moving bass."
    - New York Times



    "A joyous combination of Haitian music of all genres."
    - Financial Times



    "The opener, 'Renmen', is brightened by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, with bursts of brass underlining the celebration of love, and a clarinet solo from Charlie Gabriel bubbling up like Mozart relocated to the Lower Ninth."
    - Financial Times



    "One to play on repeat."
    - Songlines



    "This is only Lakou Mizik's second release, but it is as good a Haitian album as I've heard in years—adventurous, original, inspiring and a shot in the arm for anyone tempted to let life's woes get them down."
    - Afropop Worldwide



    Description

    Recorded at Arcade Fire's studio, the new album by Lakou Mizik is produced by the same New Orleans producer Eric Heigle who worked the album.



    Amidst the bustle of Jazz Fest, many in the New Orleans music community embraced the project and graciously made time in their hectic schedules to come jam with Lakou Mizik. The legendary Preservation Hall Jazz Band added their timeless touch; master pianist Jon Cleary tickled New Orleans-style riffs over the band's Haitian Vodou prayers; Lost Bayou Ramblers added heavy Cajun grit; Haitian-American singer songwriter Leyla McCalla brought spine-tingling cello playing; guitar maestro Raja Kassis (Antibalas) sprinkled his six-string magic all over the tracks; and The Soul Rebels brass band blew the roof off the studio. Soon after the NOLA sessions, Eric Heigle and Jon Cleary traveled to Haiti to record with Lakou Mizik at the Artists Institute in Jacmel. Over the next few months additional sessions allowed for more guests to jump in. Iconic figures Cyril Neville, Trombone Shorty and Anders Osborne, rising star Tarriona "Tank" Ball (Tank and the Bangas), NOLA institution King James (from the Special Men), even Win & Régine from Arcade Fire helped create the unique, culture-melding sound of this album.



    The seed for Lakou Mizik's second album, HaitiaNola, to be released the Cumbacha label, was planted in 2017 when the band was invited to play the legendary New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. It was an eye-opening pilgrimage to the mythical music city and the band members immediately felt a connection. The music, the food, the architecture all reminded them of home.



    For those familiar with the history of Haiti and New Orleans, this makes a lot of sense. The Caribbean country and the Crescent City have deep historical connections. In 1791, Haitian slaves began rising up against their French masters and earned their freedom in 1804 after years of bloody rebellion. Thousands of refugees consisting of French colonists, freed people of color and slaves fled the turmoil of the revolution and ended up in the nearest French territory: New Orleans. This influx doubled the city's population and forever changed its ethnic and cultural identity.

    To this day, Haitian influences can be felt in the music of New Orleans. From the rhythms of the Mardi Gras parades to the swampy grooves of funk, echoes of this Haitian connection can still be heard in the sounds of the city. It can also be felt in the food, language, spirituality and so much more. a sunny day, when the musicians of Lakou Mizik found themselves walking down Frenchmen Street, they hatched the idea for HaitiaNola (Haiti & NOLA & Hispaniola = HaitiaNola).


  • Tracklisting

      Disc 1

      Side 1

      • 1. Renmen (feat. Preservation Hall Jazz Band)
      • 2. Pistach Griye (feat. Trombone Shorty)
      • 3. La Fanmi (feat. Jon Cleary)
      • 4. Kay Granpa (feat. Tank of Tank & The Bangas)
      • 5. Loumandja (feat. Jon Cleary)
      • 6. Lakou Dogwe (feat. Anders Osborne)
      • 7. Azaka Vini We'n
      • 8. Iko Krey˜l (feat. Win Butler & RŽgine Chassagne of Arcade Fire, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, & 79rs Gang)
      • 9. Sa Na Kenbe (feat. Cyril Neville)
      • 10. Rasanbleman (feat. Leyla McCalla)
      • 11. Grann (feat. Lost Bayou Ramblers)
      • 12. Manman Lavi (feat. The Soul Rebels)
      • 13. Bouyon Lakou (feat. The Soul Rebels)
      • 14. Mizik Sa Yo (feat. King James)

    Tracklisting

      Disc 1

      Side 1

      • 1. Renmen (feat. Preservation Hall Jazz Band)
      • 2. Pistach Griye (feat. Trombone Shorty)
      • 3. La Fanmi (feat. Jon Cleary)
      • 4. Kay Granpa (feat. Tank of Tank & The Bangas)
      • 5. Loumandja (feat. Jon Cleary)
      • 6. Lakou Dogwe (feat. Anders Osborne)
      • 7. Azaka Vini We'n
      • 8. Iko KreyËœl (feat. Win Butler & RŽgine Chassagne of Arcade Fire, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, & 79rs Gang)
      • 9. Sa Na Kenbe (feat. Cyril Neville)
      • 10. Rasanbleman (feat. Leyla McCalla)
      • 11. Grann (feat. Lost Bayou Ramblers)
      • 12. Manman Lavi (feat. The Soul Rebels)
      • 13. Bouyon Lakou (feat. The Soul Rebels)
      • 14. Mizik Sa Yo (feat. King James)